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science funding, everyone would be in . >> that's one of my lines. okay and i believe this for a long time. for a long time i was a free market guy i would say there are exceptions. let's not be extremists here. it's okay to have a free market in shoes, there are some things the market can't provide. i would thought obviously science is one of those. you can't necessarily earn a profit on basic science. it doesn't turn an immediate profit. you can't always capture the profit from science your competitor will grab the discovery and earn the profit. therefore will beless science undertaken. it's a typical neoclassical model. it's not going work in the free market. i believe it. it's it turns out it's not the case at all. secondly, the old model that we sort of abide by centuries ago the way science operates is gather data, you exam it, you draw some hypothesis and come up with experiments. and the experiment either confirms or does not confirm it. provisionally confirm or does not confirm the high pot cyst. that's the way science operates. again, that sounds possible but it turns out none of
science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to. so should become one of america's most celebrated and beloved authors. a subset she turned into a different direction. it is a disturbing book, a worrisome book that pointed out that we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. well, since it's meant 1962 any more thought would explain a little more for you about to rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in this house in springdale, pennsylvania near pittsburgh and allegheny river. she was born about the upstairs bedrooms of this has come with at the time did not have that addition on the right-hand side dish ec. it stopped at the chimney on the right. a simple, modest house, to downstairs into upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couplet outhouses up that come to a shed in the front where they occasionally kept the horse. it was a little bit in the??? words.? it wasn't completely in the country, but there is enough property around????????t carson could explore the was often wi
getting equal pay or moving ahead is so few women take on science, technology, education and math. i went to school as an engineer in the 80s and was the only woman in the program. ten years later i still don't find any women who become save the engineers the way i did. is there a way to push the younger generation to take those harder courses and break those barriers? >> there is some work to do that and the educational system is stepping up to do that but then you come up against the situation they discovered at yale, that even though women have the same qualifications they are not treated equally. >> we have to encourage women. that is one area in technology and science where women have not made has significant a role as they have in law and medicine and it starts early. it starts in kindergarten where you have to encourage that. i saw the same study but be that as it may women make a lot more money -- [talking over each other] >> in the liberal arts. >> something you want to say? we have time for one more question. >> no, go ahead. the other people talk. >> sandra fluke went to orgasm
value-added economy and that doesn't just mean skills like math and science although we are lagging behind 30 or 40 other countries in the world in that regard. it also means skills associated with creativity and innovation because our edge as a country comes in the area where we can use our creativity but we also protect creativity in a way that places like china and others don't. in a content driven world, software driven world, that combination of creative people, a system that promotes and protect creativity is probably the real ace in the hole. >> host: let's take bob's comment and tie that to your previous book superclass. you have mentioned we are creating a class of people way up here and everyone else is being left behind in a sense. >> guest: the gap is growing between the ridges 1% and the rest of us. they have benefited more than anyone else in the course of the past week in years. most of the gains that have come with 90% of the gains that have come from the last expansion went to them. people at the bottom of society are more likely to stay there than ever before. we u
be a different story. christian science believe children should not be taken to the doctor when they are ill, has also been litigated successfully. some forms of so-called alternative medical treatment have led to abuse and neglect convictions. it is important to treat all these cases to get there. is there a substantial burden on the parents's religious freedom and if so does it compelling public interest justify the imposition of this burden? now to the burqa. the burqa for minors is not in the same class as genital mutilation, it is not irreversible and does not endanger health or impair other bodily function. we will get to the whole argument in a minute but i will say more about that. if it is imposed by physical or sexual violence and that violence ought to be legally punished. otherwise, however, it seems to be in the same category of all sorts of requirements, pleasant and uncared pleasant for parents impose on their children listen practices of this type do appear to violate laws against child save chief. that is one law professor amy shoea submitted in her pocketbook the tiger mother th
not a science. and hopefully will be able to make a dent in that kind of -- that's what and those people will never admit they were wrong but it's -- i'm reading about for light reading i'm reading about -- [inaudible] [laughter] [applause] i think tonight -- [applause] i think tonight we brought a lot of life to this audience and the questions that economics and the challenge behind it. i'm grateful to you both. thank you for the discussion. thanks a lot for being here. [applause] >>> we'd like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. >>> and now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stewart. he's an author, the future of jews is the name of the book. ambassador, why are you writing a book about the future of the jews? >> we have survived 3,000 years of calamityies and we survived and leave thrived and contributed to societies even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges, and the question is having survived those terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success, and integration? and i lo
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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